Showing 41-50 of 54 results
CDC

Estimated Impact of Influenza Pandemics

June 25, 2008

1918-19 Spanish Flu (H1N1)• 20-50 million deaths worldwide• >500,000 U.S. deaths 1957-58 Asian Flu (H2N2)• 70,000 U.S. deaths   1968-69 Hong Kong Flu (H3N2)• 34,000 U.S. deaths Estimated Impact of a Future Avian Influenza Pandemic in the U.S. Deaths: 89,000 – 207,000 Hospitalizations: 314,000 – …

CDC

Escherichia coli – Overview

November 3, 2007

Escherichia coli O157:H7 is a leading cause of foodborne illness. Based on a 1999 estimate, 73,000 cases of infection and 61 deaths occur in the United States each year. Infection with E. coli often leads to bloody diarrhea, and occasionally to kidney failure. People can …

FDA

Salmonella – Overview

November 3, 2007

Salmonella is a rod-shaped, motile bacterium – nonmotile exceptions S. gallinarum and S. pullorum – nonsporeforming and Gram-negative. There is a widespread occurrence in animals, especially in poultry and swine. Environmental sources of the organism include water, soil, insects, factory surfaces, kitchen surfaces, animal feces, …

FDA

Clostridium botulinum – Overview

November 3, 2007

Clostridium botulinum is an anaerobic, Gram-positive, spore-forming rod that produces a potent neurotoxin. The spores are heat-resistant and can survive in foods that are incorrectly or minimally processed. Seven types (A, B, C, D, E, F and G) of botulism are recognized, based on the …

FDA

Campylobacter jejuni – Overview

November 3, 2007

Campylobacter jejuni is a Gram-negative slender, curved, and motile rod. It is a microaerophilic organism, which means it has a requirement for reduced levels of oxygen. It is relatively fragile, and sensitive to environmental stresses (e.g., 21% oxygen, drying, heating, disinfectants, acidic conditions). Because of …

CDC

SARS – Overview

November 1, 2007

What is SARS?   Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a viral respiratory illness that was recognized as a global threat in March 2003, after first appearing in Southern China in November 2002.

CDC

MRSA and the Workplace

October 28, 2007

Staphylococcus aureus, often referred to simply as “staph,” is a type of bacteria commonly carried on the skin or in the nose of healthy people. Sometimes, staph can cause an infection. Staph bacteria are one of the most common causes of skin infections in the …